October 6, 2019 – A View from the Rectory

Financial and Stewardship Reports

I write to encourage you to join me for a ‘Town Hall’ meeting on Thursday, October 10, at 7pm in the extension of the Church of the Resurrection. This week I am providing you with a fiscal accounting summary of our parish for the fiscal year of July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019 http://saintmaxkolbe.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/2019-Financial-Report-for-the-people-Final.pdf.

I will also make available for your consideration, some of the efforts of our parishioners to care for those who are in need of spiritual, emotional, and/or physical assistance in the Stewardship Report http://saintmaxkolbe.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/2019-Parish-Stewardship-Report-1.pdf. It would not be possible to present the full scope of our efforts in one summary sheet. For this reason, I ask pardon of those who may feel that their efforts went unnoticed or unacknowledged. At the same time, I trust that our efforts are not done to win the praise of others, but rather, are in response to all that God has given us.

The Parish Finance Council, the Parish Pastoral Council and I have sought to be prudent stewards of the resources entrusted to our care. You can read about these efforts in greater detail in the Pastoral Council Minutes found on our parish website. I know that transparency in this regard is one of our foremost obligations to you. I hope this brief report reflects our intention to be faithful to this obligation.

Members of the Parish Pastoral Council and Finance Council will be present to address any questions, concerns and/or recommendations that you may have for the life of our parish family.

  Respect Life Month

Each October the Church in the United States celebrates Respect Life Month, and the first Sunday of October is observed as Respect Life Sunday. As Catholics, we are called to cherish, defend, and protect those who are most vulnerable, from the beginning of life to its end, and at every point in between. During the month of October, the Church asks us to reflect more deeply on the dignity of every human life.

We know that from the time we are knit together in our mothers’ wombs until we take our final breaths, each moment of our lives is a gift from God. While every season of life brings its own challenges and trials, each season also gives us new opportunities to grow in our relationship with God.

Today the gift of life is threatened in countless ways. Those who are most vulnerable, rather than receiving the protection they deserve, are all too often seen as a burden and as expendable. As new attacks on human life continue to emerge, we can be tempted to despair, but Christ instead offers us unfailing hope.

Hope is not false optimism or empty positivity. Christian hope is something much more profound and goes to the very depths of our identity as followers of Christ. Hope is the virtue “by which we desire the kingdom of heaven and eternal life as our happiness, placing our trust in Christ’s promises and relying not on our own strength, but on the help of the grace of the Holy Spirit” (CCC, 1817).

Like us, Christ entered the world through the womb of a woman. He willingly experienced the fullness of human suffering. He breathed his last on the Cross at Calvary in order that He might save us. Therefore, “God is the foundation of hope: not any god, but the God who has a human face and who has loved us to the end.” (Spe salvi 31).

Christians know “they have a future: it is not that they know the details of what awaits them, but they know in general terms that their life will not end in emptiness” (SS2). For this reason, a woman experiencing a difficult pregnancy can find the strength to welcome her precious child into the world. A man facing a terminal diagnosis can see that the end of his earthly life is only the beginning of eternal life with Christ.

The Church teaches us that “the one who has hope lives differently” (SS2). Christ’s promise of salvation does not mean that we will be spared from suffering. Rather, the promise of salvation ensures that even in the darkest moments of our lives, we will be given the strength to persevere. By virtue of this Christian hope, we can face any challenge or trial. When the seas of life swell and we are battered by the waves, hope allows us to remain anchored in the heart of God. May we hold fast to Christ our hope, from the beginning of life to its very end.

Fr. Pete